This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site you agree to our use of cookies. To find out more, see our Privacy and Cookies policy.
Skip to the content

Share this

Free weekly newswire

Sign up to receive all our latest news direct to your inbox.

Physics on film

100 Second Science Your scientific questions answered simply by specialists in less than 100 seconds.

Watch now

Bright Recruits

At all stages of your career – whether you're an undergraduate, graduate, researcher or industry professional – brightrecruits.com can help find the job for you.

Find your perfect job

Physics connect

Are you looking for a supplier? Physics Connect lists thousands of scientific companies, businesses, non-profit organizations, institutions and experts worldwide.

Start your search today

Blog

Higgs seen on canvas

higgs potrait.jpg
Peter Higgs with his portrait (credit: Callum Bennetts/Maverick Photo Agency)

By Michael Banks

As the old clichĂ© goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. For Peter Higgs, a sighting of the Higgs boson, the sub-atomic particle he predicted over 40 years ago that is thought to give particles their intrinsic masses, would be worth more than a few words of congratulations – possibly a Nobel Prize.

But until the Large Hadron Collider starts up again later this year — or the Tevatron fails to spot the Higgs first — he will just have to make do with the picture.

A portrait of the 79-year-old physicist was unveiled on Tuesday at the University of Edinburgh showing a younger, slightly more rounded Higgs looking at the remnants of a particle collision.

The oil-painting, commissioned by the University of Edinburgh and painted by Scottish based artist Ken Currie, shows Higgs holding a pair of glasses and looking both towards the unseen artist and – as seen in the mirror behind – to the debris of colliding particles.

Speaking at the launch of the portrait at the university, Higgs said he was quite relieved the artist didn’t make him hold difficult poses for the portrait.

“It is a great surprise to me that the university wanted to paint my portrait,” Higgs said. “I would not have predicted it 30 years ago.” Indeed, he was rather busy predicting other things.

This entry was posted in General. Bookmark the permalink.
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

2 comments

  1. Like so many at the very top, Prof Higgs is as modest as ever. Asked about his relatively early retirement (see recent interview in NS) he claimed that he had difficulty keeping up with the maths of gauge theory when the Higgs mechanism started to attract worldwide interest. He then “got interested in supersymmetry, only to find that challenging too”, so eventually decided to give the whole business a rest. Humbling how the very best sometimes decide to go off and do something completely different…

  2. Yves Grauls

    Why is it always ONLY about Peter Higgs?
    Why does everybody seem to forget that Peter Brout and Francois Englert discovered this particle and published their paper on the subject 6 months before Peter Higgs did?
    Why do we call it the ‘Higgs bozon’ anyway?
    Why not, as Brout and Englert propose the ‘scalar bozon’ or, more correctly the ‘BEH bozon’ (Brout-Englert-Higgs)?
    Peter Higgs never mentions Brout and Englert, either. It is a shame for such a famous scientist not to have recognition for his peers.

Leave a comment

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Guidelines

  • Comments should be relevant to the article and not be used to promote your own work, products or services.
  • Please keep your comments brief (we recommend a maximum of 250 words).
  • We reserve the right to remove excessively long, inappropriate or offensive entries.

Show/hide formatting guidelines

Tag Description Example Output
<a> Hyperlink <a href="http://www.google.com">google</a> google
<abbr> Abbreviation <abbr title="World Health Organisation" >WHO</abbr> WHO
<acronym> Acronym <acronym title="as soon as possible">ASAP</acronym> ASAP
<b> Bold <b>Some text</b> Some text
<blockquote> Quoted from another source <blockquote cite="http://iop.org/">IOP</blockquote>
IOP
<cite> Cite <cite>Diagram 1</cite> Diagram 1
<del> Deleted text From this line<del datetime="2012-12-17"> this text was deleted</del> From this line this text was deleted
<em> Emphasized text In this line<em> this text was emphasised</em> In this line this text was emphasised
<i> Italic <i>Some text</i> Some text
<q> Quotation WWF goal is to build a future <q cite="http://www.worldwildlife.org/who/index.html">
where people live in harmony with nature and animals</q>
WWF goal is to build a future
where people live in harmony with nature and animals
<strike> Strike text <strike>Some text</strike> Some text
<strong> Stronger emphasis of text <strong>Some text</strong> Some text
WordPress Appliance - Powered by TurnKey Linux