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Special report: physics in India

By Matin Durrani

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The latest Physics World special report, which examines the challenges for physicists in India, is ready for you to read online now.

The report contains a great mix of news, features and opinion, including a look at the work carried out a top research centres such as the Indian Institute of Science, the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and the Raman Research Institute.

It also has a great podcast on “India’s physics rebels” – the students who resist the pressure to study engineering and let their passion for physics burn instead.

For the record, here’s a list of the main articles in the report.

Welcome to science city – Why is Bangalore home to so many top science institutes?

Igniting a passion for physics among India’s top students – What the Indian government is doing to get more students turned on to science

New horizons for the Tata institute – How one of Mumbai’s leading research centres has ambitious plans to expand into Hyderabad

Speaking up for women – An interview with Shobhana Narasimhan from the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research in Bangalore

India sticks to the thorium trail – Why thorium is still so central to India’s energy plans

India sets its sight on Mars – Opinions are still divided over the country’s bold Martian plans

Digging deep for neutrinos – A look at India’s ambitious plans for a huge underground neutrino detector

Uniting Indian astronomy – An interview with Ajit Kembhavi from the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune

Delivering on a promise – Shiraz Minwalla from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research says that India must urgently reform its education system.

The report reveals that money for India’s top physicists is thankfully not in short supply, but what India currently lacks is a critical concentration of highly capable scientists who can make the country a world leader in research and boost its innovation.

I hope you enjoy reading the report – and do let me have your comments by e-mailing pwld@iop.org.

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2 comments

  1. nirmal b chakrabarti

    It is surely encouraging to notice a trend to switch to basic sciences on the part of bright young students.Unfortunately the quality of science education remains unsatisfactory particularly in experimental sciences.Very few institutions offer nuclear physics and chemistry.The report on Raman’s contribution is surely highly welcome.

  2. Dr. Raghumani Singh Ningthoujam

    Let us cultivate basic science in India. Also, we should give freedom to work either experimentally or theoretically. Let us recall our previous scientific approach and their scientific contribution (1900-1950). Simultaneously, we have to think how to get sustainable environment in terms of food, security, energy and peace.
    Wish you and all Happy National Science Day
    Let us celebrate!!!

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