This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site you agree to our use of cookies. To find out more, see our Privacy and Cookies policy.
Skip to the content

Free weekly newswire

Sign up to receive all our latest news direct to your inbox.

Physics on film

100 Second Science Your scientific questions answered simply by specialists in less than 100 seconds.

Watch now

Bright Recruits

At all stages of your career – whether you're an undergraduate, graduate, researcher or industry professional – brightrecruits.com can help find the job for you.

Find your perfect job

Physics connect

Are you looking for a supplier? Physics Connect lists thousands of scientific companies, businesses, non-profit organizations, institutions and experts worldwide.

Start your search today

Blog

The ins and outs of black holes and a new way of thinking about general relativity

 

By Hamish Johnston

While at the Convergence conference at the Perimeter Institute (PI), Physics World’s Louise Mayor and I had dinner with Sean Gryb. He did his PhD at the PI and is now doing a postdoc at Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands. In the above video he shares some of his highlights of the conference.

Gryb is working on “shape dynamics”, which is a new idea for re-evaluating Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity (GR). The idea was initiated by Julian Barbour and Gryb became involved in the development of shape dynamics while he was at PI. He now belongs to a small international band of physicists who are developing the concept. While shape dynamics is an alternative treatment of GR, the ultimate goal of their work seems to be the creation of a new framework for a theory of quantum gravity – an important goal of theoretical physics.

Continue reading

Posted in Convergence 2015 | Tagged , , | 3 Comments | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

Women in graphene

 By James Dacey in Manchester

Women in Graphene posterToday is the third day of Graphene Week, a conference at the University of Manchester devoted to the fundamental science and applications of 2D materials. While many of the talks require a PhD in materials science to even understand the title (I for one am struggling), one session taking place this evening has the refreshingly simple title: Women in Graphene. Intrigued, I caught up with the session organizer Katarina Boustedt from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

Graphene Week is an annual event organized by the Graphene Flagship, the EU’s biggest ever research initiative with a budget of €1 billion. As promoting equality is a key part of the Flagship’s mission, Boustedt has launched this initiative to support women working in 2D materials research. Tonight’s two-hour session is designed to start the conversation and find out the types of support that women researchers would like.

Continue reading

Posted in General | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

Nergis Mavalvala on the upcoming Advanced LIGO run

 

By Louise Mayor in Waterloo, Canada

The search for ripples in space–time known as gravitational waves is one of my favourite scientific endeavours. So here at the Perimeter Institute’s Convergence conference, I couldn’t miss the opportunity to talk to Nergis Mavalvala, one of the speakers here.

A physicist at MIT, Mavalvala works on the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in the US. LIGO’s first six observing runs took place from 2002 to 2010 and yielded no detection of a gravitational wave. Since then, LIGO physicists have been working on increasing the instrument’s sensitivity – they needed to make it even better at measuring the stretching and compressing of the interferometers’ 4 km-long arms thought to occur if a gravitational wave passes through them.

Five years on, LIGO’s $200m upgrade is now complete.

Continue reading

Posted in Convergence 2015 | Tagged , , | 1 Comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

Taking a peek inside the UK’s National Graphene Institute

Photo of Tony Ling

Look, no dust – National Graphene Institute architect Tony Ling showing off the PVC blackboards (Courtesy: Physics World/James Dacey)

 

By Matin Durrani in Manchester

Do an Internet image search of the word “physicist” and you’ll come across countless pictures of physicists posing in front of blackboards covered with bewildering looking equations. That’s because blackboards are traditionally a common sight in physics labs and research centres – in fact, they’re everywhere at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, where my Physics World colleagues Hamish Johnston and Louise Mayor are right now.

But over at the UK’s new £61m National Graphene Insitute (NGI), which I toured earlier today, blackboards are very much verboten. It’s the chalk dust you see, which is a no-no for health-and-safety bosses at the University of Manchester, where the NGI is located. Incidentally, Manchester is also currently home to Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov, who shared the 2010 Nobel Prize for Physics for isolating graphene for the first time.

Continue reading

Posted in General | Tagged , , | Leave a comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

What do strange metals and black holes have in common?

Subir Sachdev

Subir Sachdev.

By Hamish Johnston in Waterloo, Canada

Harvard’s Subir Sachdev has just taken the audience here at the Convergence conference on a delightful romp through the phase diagram of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors. What I found most interesting was not the superconducting phase, but rather Sachdev’s description of the “strange metal” phase.

This phase occurs when the cuprate copper-oxide layer is highly doped with holes and has perplexed physicists for some time – hence its strange moniker. It has no quasiparticles and lots of low-energy excitations so there is no easy way to describe the collective behaviour of the electrons.

Continue reading

Posted in Convergence 2015 | Tagged , | 1 Comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

Maria Spiropulu talks about multiple Higgs beyond the Standard Model

 

By Hamish Johnston in Waterloo, Canada

Caltech’s Maria Spiropulu has a great party trick. She can demonstrate the bizarre rotational property of a spin ½ particle using a full glass of water and a contortion of her arm without spilling a drop. This was just one of the many highlights of her talk about the future of experimental particle physics that she gave yesterday at the Convergence meeting here at the Perimeter Institute.

While Spiropulu doesn’t talk about spin in the above video, she does explain why she is looking forward to analysing data from the 13 TeV run of the Large Hadron Collider, where she is part of the CMS collaboration. So, what could Spiropulu and colleagues find when they dig into the vast amounts of data that CMS is currently producing? It just could be four more types of Higgs particle. To find out more watch the video.

Posted in Convergence 2015 | Tagged , , | 1 Comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

Why converge?

Neil Turok at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (Courtesy: Gabriela Secara)

Neil Turok at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (Courtesy: Gabriela Secara)

By Louise Mayor in Waterloo, Canada

Right now, top physicists from around the world are arriving in Waterloo, Canada, to attend a unique conference. Christened Convergence, the meeting is the brainchild of Neil Turok, director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (PI) in Waterloo, where the event will be based. I spoke to Turok to find out what motivated him to set up this conference, what makes it so special, and what he hopes it will achieve.

Continue reading

Posted in Convergence 2015 | Tagged , , , , , , | 24 Comments | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

Converging streams, secret science and more

 

By Tushna Commissariat

Regular readers will know that Physics World‘s Hamish Johnston and Louise Mayor will be attending the “Convergence” conference at the Perimeter Institute in Canada from tomorrow onwards.  While the conference will undoubtedly prove exciting – just look at this list of speakers – it looks like the institute already has convergence on its mind as this month’s Slice of PI contemplates the “converging streams” of art and science. The video above features Perimeter researcher and artist Alioscia Hamma, who finds solace and symmetry in both his art and physics. Watch the video and read more about his work on the Perimeter blog.

Continue reading

Posted in The Red Folder | Tagged , , | Leave a comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

Busting dust deep underground in SNOLAB

SNOLAB's Nigel Smith (left), Ian Lawson (centre) and Chris Jillings

Squeaky clean: SNOLAB’s Nigel Smith (left), Ian Lawson (centre) and Chris Jillings.

By Hamish Johnston at the CAP Congress in Edmonton, Alberta

I’m a bit of a DIY enthusiast and one thing that I know about drilling into a masonry wall is that you should hold a vacuum-cleaner hose to the hole or you will end up with dust all over the wall and the floor below. Believe it or not, that is exactly what workers at SNOLAB in Canada do in order to keep background levels of radiation from affecting their dark-matter and neutrino detectors.

Continue reading

Posted in CAP Congress 2015 | Tagged , | Leave a comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile

The physics of Alzheimer’s disease

Jennifer Tang and Maikel Rheinstadter

Jennifer Tang and Maikel Rheinstadter.

By Hamish Johnston at the CAP Congress in Edmonton, Alberta

One promising route to understanding the causes of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) –  and hopefully finding a cure – is the study of how and why proteins in the brain sometimes form neurotoxic plaques. These plaques are disc-like structures that are about 50 µm in diameter and made from polypeptides. Their presence in the grey matter of the brain is strongly associated with AD and some other neurological conditions, but why they form and why they cause dementia are both not understood.

Continue reading

Posted in CAP Congress 2015 | Tagged | Leave a comment | Permalink
View all posts by this author  | View this author's profile
WordPress Appliance - Powered by TurnKey Linux