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Tag archives: GCHQ puzzle

Physics World at 25: Puzzle round-up

Physics World at 25 Puzzle

By Louise Mayor

Twenty-six days ago we launched the Physics World at 25 Puzzle with the first and easiest of the five puzzles in the series. Today we announced the fifth, final and most fiendish puzzle of all.

Did anyone out there manage to bag the whole set? See where you rank by entering all five answers, in sequential order and as a single string of text with no spaces, in the box below.

However you do, we sincerely hope you enjoy trying the puzzles.

For any frustrated puzzlers out there who are at the end of their tether and want to know the answers, do not fret: the solutions will be revealed in the January 2014 issue of Physics World.

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Physics World at 25: Puzzle 5

By Louise Mayor

It is time for the final and most fiendish challenge in the Physics World at 25 Puzzle. Have you got what it takes to figure it out? #PW25puzzle

Check out our round-up of the entire puzzle series where you can enter your answers to all five puzzles.

 

This question consists of a list of 55 words, plus one lone word. You have to work out where the lone word slots into the list. Each of the 56 words can be associated with another word and this second set of 56 words are in alphabetical order. The second set of 56 words divide up into seven sets of eight words, with the seven sets representing seven methods of pairing. The list reads from left to right, top to bottom.

Where does FLOW slot into the following list?

METEOR        POSITRON      PRINCIPLE     MARS

NUMBER        MODEL         COINCIDENCE   BORDA

DISH          NEUTRON       UNIVERSE      EFFECT

MOON          LANE          DAY           MAN

LINES         HOLOGRAPHY    KLEIN         NAMAKA

KING          SUN           GIBBS         INDUCTANCE

FREQUENCY     TIME          WATER         ENERGY

IO            MASS          CYCLOTRON     LANDAU

PHOBOS        WELL          LEVY          FERRIMAGNETISM

TRITON        TON           RESISTANCE    PRESSURE

ROSE          GROSS         CONSTANT      CHARON

ARGON         NEUTRINO      FORD          TITAN   

CONDUCTANCE   FRICTION      MIRANDA       FORCE

POWER         DARCY         MODULUS

The answer needs to be entered as three words, in this order: the associated word of the listed word that precedes FLOW, FLOW’s associated word, and the associated word of the listed word that follows FLOW. The three words should be entered as a single string of text with no spaces.

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Physics World at 25: Puzzle 4

By Louise Mayor

Prepare to be perplexed by the fourth and penultimate brainteaser in the Physics World at 25 Puzzle. #PW25puzzle

 

Which food is, unusually, mentioned in the third of these well-known laws of physics?

KEPLcRS FIddT iAW ecYc hHec adu OrBug ey hVbit PLsNgm oS ff fjagnhf WenH bbg iUq sg Odh cF fme dfCv

egmyffa kijpNd vql DffmqszgS doW kHd garbtnpgmvbd dF kx nBJdCe xdLjcpe co uic McaS knD jHe FjRcE ACgecG ON IT

THE mmIRD LAW OF THERMODYNAMwCS GIVst xHe kNoRxPY iF nqsnx Ay kjMsivmTUio jjPnOACHlS ZERO

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Physics World at 25: Puzzle 3

By Louise Mayor

Have you got what it takes to crack the third conundrum in the Physics World at 25 Puzzle? You can catch up on the previous two instalments here. #PW25puzzle

 

You are trying to find a phrase with the pattern 3, 6, 2, 8, 8. The puzzle answer is the six-letter word. We hope you enjoy the joke.

QIGC-YLKQDQRIKR INTPRDLKQ DKYGTSDKA IWYBPKAI PKS YLOOIGPRDLK ICCIYRQ

QDHA-EJSDPWRSEKJ RKPPDRSEKJ SK LDJQESY-ATJRSEKJWH WMMPKXEIWSEKJQ AKP IWJY-DHDRSPKJ QYQSDIQ

IMJQHN OPTPY JF PVY YDYEPMJH ITO WX T OPJEVTOPAE GYPVJN

PWOct13puzzle-3

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Physics World at 25: Puzzle 2

By Louise Mayor

Welcome to the second instalment of the Physics World at 25 Puzzle. The first puzzle was released last week and your second challenge lies below. #PW25puzzle

 

Is Schrödinger’s cat alive or dead?

1. Schrödinger’s cat is alive.
2. Schrödinger’s cat is dead.
3. Exactly one of statements 6 and 9 is true.
4. Exactly one of statements 2 and 6 is false.
5. Statements 4, 5 and 10 are all false.
6. Exactly one of statements 1 and 10 is false.
7. Exactly 5 statements are true.
8. Exactly one of statements 3 and 10 is false.
9. Exactly one of statements 6 and 10 is true.
10. Exactly one of statements 1 and 2 is false.
11. Statements 1, 8 and 11 are all false.

Enter your answer as a list, in numerical order, of the number(s) of the statements that are definitely true, as a single string with no spaces, such as, for example, 25811.

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Physics World at 25: Puzzle 1

By Louise Mayor

Physics World at 25 Puzzle

This month is the 25th anniversary of Physics World – the member magazine of the Institute of Physics – and in addition to a special celebratory issue, we’ve decided to set you a challenge.

In fact, we have teamed up with GCHQ – one of the UK’s three Intelligence Agencies and home to some of the country’s hottest code-breaking talent – to create with us a set of five physics-themed puzzles. The puzzles have been devised by three GCHQ members of staff, who today we still know only as Colin, Nick and Pete. (Thank you, guys!)

Below is Puzzle 1, the first of the five. The rest will be released on successive Tuesdays throughout October on this blog. The first is the easiest – they only get harder from here on in!

(more…)

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